Demonstration in Hong Kong, Protesters and police action. An eyewitness account. Part 1.

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I was in attendance at the demonstration organized by League of Social Democrats for universal suffrage and prisoners of conscious in China.  It was lead by Legco member Hon. Leung Kwok-hung (長毛) also known as Longhair. The group numbered about 70 people.

My own purpose was to show support for the purpose of the demonstrators and to be a witness to the actions of both the protesters and the police.  I spoke to both protesters and police before, during and after the demonstration that lasted from 2pm to 7pm.
The police supervisor told me prior to the march that the group had not applied to the police for permission to demonstrate and if they kept on the sidewalk they would be allowed to march. Leung Kwok-hung told me that people should be able to walk anywhere they want in a public place without receiving permission.  This appeared to be the battle lines drawn.

As the group or individuals depending upon your viewpoint began to walk towards the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) Liaison Office in Western District the police clearly directed the roads that they or he/she should take by having police in lines across certain walkways directly towards the Liaison Office.  The demonstrators met in the park and the direction out of the park was blocked by a police line only leaving one direction to exit the park. As individuals who made up the demonstrators as Mr. Leung sees it, tried to turn right onto a sidewalk 3 meters wide as they left the park and directly towards the Liaison Office and they were forced to go left in the exact opposite direction as a group by a line of police linked arm in arm across the natural direction.  Crossing the street in the crossing area again they were forced to backtrack in the exact oppposite direction from the Liaison Office in front of the HSBC building with 20 meter sidewalks and they reached another street with a sidewalk of about 2 meters again in the opposite direction of the Liaison Office and crossing at the proper crossing they walked around a fence next to the street running 50 meters into the street. The sidewalk is very narrow at 2 meters wide at the bus stop. At no time did I observe the traffic disrupted as the traffic was almost nonexistent on a public holiday. As they reached the bus stop area in the bus lane I felt that the marchers were getting ready to go back on to the sidewalk area which had widened in that area.  Suddenly the police formed a line refusing the marchers to proceed forwards.  Within seconds another line of police formed a barrier between the street and the marchers. Another barrier of police was formed behind the marchers to keep them from individually leaving in that direction. At that point the marchers just stood, sat down, chanted slogans and read books for the next 5 hours. Less then 200 meters from where they began the walk.

Interestingly enough across the street was a group known as “Love Hong Kong” which the media has reported as a pro PRC group.  Numbering about 30 people they shouted at the marchers, now hemmed in by the police, and also carried banners written in Chinese.  Once the police had the marchers surrounded the “Love Hong Kong” group left, leaving only two shouters behind, and the group moved to another demonstration being across being held across the Victoria Harbour by the pan democratic party known as “People Power” led by Erica Yuen Mi Ming (袁彌明).

The police during the course of the evening numbered I estimate at a total of 500-600 and at any given time 200 surrounded the protesters who were now not moving. Different groups of police changed during the course of the day. Plain clothes undercover police numbered about 20 and some appeared as media photographers or it appeared to me even as students.  At least 15 uniformed officers with video cameras where recording.  The police line was up to five deep in front and they held each others backsides to keep any marcher from moving in any direction except backwards where only two officers where now posted.  On the side of the street officers were lined up to 3 deep. The remaining side of the protesters was the bus stop and sidewalk.

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3 thoughts on “Demonstration in Hong Kong, Protesters and police action. An eyewitness account. Part 1.

  1. Pingback: Demonstration in Hong Kong, Protesters and police action. An eyewitness account. Part 2. | The Journalist "The Tank Man" - Standing up for what is right even if you stand alone.

  2. Pingback: Church leaders, stand up for the dignity of all Hong Kong people. | The Journalist "The Tank Man" - Standing up for what is right even if you stand alone.

  3. Pingback: Demonstration in Hong Kong, Protesters and police action. An eyewitness account. Part 3. | The Journalist "The Tank Man" - Standing up for what is right even if you stand alone.

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